Dining halls: love them or hate them, they’re an integral part of your first year on campus. The other options are simply not feasible. Cooking can take time and eat out can be expensive. Plus, USC requires you to have a meal plan when living in university-affiliated housing. Not to mention, dining halls are extremely convenient for a quick pit stop between meetings. For me, I was particularly mindful of the food options when I was deciding on where to go to college. As an avid foodie and strict vegetarian, I wanted to make sure that I could use my meal swipes. Luckily, USC offers plenty of specialized foods that accommodate all diets.

  1. Specialized sections: All of the dining halls have vegetarian and vegan options, with one having an allergen-friendly zone! So if you want to go out and eat with your friends, you know you can always find a substantial meal that you can eat.
  2. Plenty of Variety: Meals are cycled through just like the normal meat alternatives. The dining halls offer a good selection of beans, tofu, soy, and other protein alternatives from a variety of cuisines.
  3. Clear labeling: USC dining halls do a fantastic job at describing exactly what is in their food. That means you know exactly what your options are in the dining hall.

Other Options

If dining halls still aren’t your jam, check out the other food options!

  1. Dining dollars: You can use dining dollars at select restaurants on campus. Pretty much every restaurant offers some sort of vegetarian option.
  2. Grocery: Since Trader Joe’s is right in the village, you can drop by and pick from a robust selection of snacks. For those who are dairy-free, gluten-free, meat-free, egg-free, and anything in between, there are always options for you.

As you can see, USC is extremely progressive in its food offerings. Whatever foods you prefer, you’re bound to find options at USC.

Jordan Cahoon

Jordan Cahoon

MAJOR: Computer Science YEAR: Class of 2024 HOMETOWN: Seattle, Washington PRONOUNS: she/her/hers INSTA: @itscahoon On campus, I'm involved in CAIS++, the student-run artificial intelligence society, and Novus Think Tank, a social good organization where I worked on promoting sustainability in the local LA area. Additionally, I work in the Chiang lab at Keck School Medicine where I conduct analysis that demonstrates the need for ethnic diversity in genetic studies.

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