AME 310: Putting the “Engine” in Engineer

andrew-2017 Aerospace and Mechanical, Andrew, Viterbi Class 0 Comments

Howdy everyone,

 
Seeing as I’m pretty much at the halfway point of my college years, I’ve been thinking back over my classes and what I’ve learned. Today, though, I’m going to highlight one class in particular. Last semester I took AME 310, Engineering Thermodynamics I, taught by Professor Egolfopoulos – and man, it was great.

 

Engineering Thermodynamics I, aka Ice Cream Engineering

Engineering Thermodynamics I, aka Ice Cream Engineering

 

From a purely engineering-based perspective, this class has given me some great tools. I’ve learned how to analyze heat engines both computationally and qualitatively, and we’ve been applying those skills to real-world examples. We spent one class going through the cooling and heating processes necessary to ship natural gas around the world, eventually finding out that it took a lot of energy (really, I mean a LOT) to use and transport the stuff. I feel prepared to deal with more and more complex and intricate thermodynamics-related scenarios now that we’ve gained insight into how to approach these sorts of problems.

 

Professor Egolfopoulos, though, wasn’t content to just teach us how to look at an engine and give a bunch of numbers on it. He expanded the class to discuss far more than calculations and analysis; he wanted us to look at the bigger picture. We discussed the issues of today that we’re going to have to be the ones to solve, and gave us an engineering perspective on issues that don’t only involve engineers. I think, in addition to teaching us the thermodynamics tools we needed to know, Professor Egolfopoulos reminded us why we’re learning the things we are. I wouldn’t hesitate to take a class with him again.

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